8-spotted Jewel II

8-spotted Jewel II

Buprestis octoguttata Eight spotted jewel beetle
11 mm

A dorsal view of this elegant jewel beetle perched on a pine twig. It's the same specimen I posted a lateral portrait of a few weeks ago.

43 natural light exposures stacked in Zerene Stacker. 

Canon 5DmkII, Sigma 180/3.5 + Kenko 2X PRO300 converter.

Studio stack: Bibio ♂

Studio stack: Bibio ♂

Bibio marci, March fly, Bibionidae
10 mm

This is a a lateral portrait of a male march fly. Male bibionids have very large, hairy and peculiar eyes. Female march flies look quite different (much smaller eyes). 

233 exposures stacked in Zerene Stacker (dead, prepared specimen).

Canon 5DmkII, Nikon PB-6 bellows, Mitutoyo M Plan Apo 10X 0.28.

8-spotted jewel

8-spotted jewel

Buprestis octoguttata Eight spotted jewel beetle
11 mm 

Early morning stack of this metallic jewel beetle. Shot an early morning in August 2015.

Stacked from 26+1 natural light exposures in Zerene Stacker. 

Canon 5DmkII, Canon MP-E65 @ 3.9X, f/5.6, 1.6s, ISO200 + one (last) exposure at f/11, 6s.

Studio stack: Phoretic Mite

Studio stack: Phoretic Mite

Uropoda cf. orbicularis (Uropodidae) on Aphodius prodromus
Size≈ 0.7 mm

Like I mentioned in my previous post the little dung beetle came with an interesting bonus species. The round reddish formation is the second larval stage of a Uropoda mite. These deutonymphs attach themselves to insects such as this dung beetle via a stalk like structure called a pedicel.

Here you can see the ventral side of the mite larva. Though it's very "streamlined" in this stage, it's possible to make out legs and palps if you look closely.

This is not a parasitic relationship, but strictly phoretic. In other words, the mites does not feed on the insects they attach themselves to, but only use them for dispersal/transportation.

This was shot in the studio and stacked from 89 exposures of a dead and cleaned subject.

Sony NEX-7, Mitutoyo M Plan Apo 10X 0.28, morfanon tube lens, Nikon PB-6 bellows, Cognisys Stackshot.

Lesser glow worm (larva)

Lesser glow worm (larva)

Phosphaenus hemipterus
10 mm

This is the larva of the lesser glow worm. My first encounter with this species! 

In spite of its name, it's a beetle. In contrary to its larger relative the "Common glow worm" (Lampyris noctiluca) this, slightly smaller species does not produce a bioluminescent glow in order to attract a mate but only if it feels threatened.

This is two handheld exposures manually pieced together in Photoshop for a slight increase in depth of field.

Canon 5DmkII, Canon MP-E65 (@ 3.3X), Canon 270 EX + DIY beautydish diffuser.

Long hover ♂

Long hover ♂

Sphaerophoria scripta, long hoverfly
7 mm

This time of year this is one of the most common insects at my favorite location. As such, they are easily overlooked but they make nice subjects.

Stacked from 37 natural light exposures in Zerene Stacker.

Canon 5DmkII, Canon MP-E65 @ 2.2X, f/7.1, 1/8s, ISO200

Curculio

Curculio

Curculio cf. venosus
Size: 7-8 mm

Early morning stack of this long snouted weevil on a tiny acorn. I'm not 100%  it's C. venosus – partly because this specimen seems to have been through some rough times with lots of its dorsal hairs appear to have been rubbed off and some kind of mud has adhered to its elytra and legs.

Shot in mid July 2015 and stacked from 28 natural light exposures in Zerene Stacker.

Sony NEX-7, Canon MP-E65 @ 1/4s, f/7.1, ISO100

Female Macropis

Female Macropis

Macropis europaea
9 mm

Early morning stack of this female Macropis bee. 

Stacked from 27 natural light exposures in Zerene Stacker.

Sony NEX-7 + Canon MP-E65 @ f/6.3, 1/8s, ISO100

Studio stack: Another Temnostoma

Studio stack: Another Temnostoma

Temnostoma bombylans
14 mm

In my previous post I showed a Temnostoma vespiforme that had hatched from a piece of birch wood I had brought into my terrarium a few weeks ago. I later found another, smaller Temnostoma species dead in my terrarium. It turned out to be T. bombylans and this is a studio portrait of a female specimen. In many cases a portrait like this is enough to be able to determine the sex of a hoverfly – females generally have a  wider separation between the eyes whereas in males the eyes tend to connect above the antennae.

Shot in the studio and stacked from 107 exposures of a dead/prepared specimen in Zerene Stacker.

Sony NEX-7, Nikon PB-6 bellows, Mitutoyo M Plan Apo 5X, morfanon tube lens.

Studio stack: Temnostoma

Studio stack: Temnostoma

Temnostoma vespiforme, Syrphidae
Size: 17 mm

This relatively large wasp-like hoverfly hatched in my terrarium a few weeks ago. A month earlier I had brought in a nice piece of moss covered birch wood from the woods and apparently it contained a couple of Syrphid pupae.

I considered releasing it outside after shooting a few handheld flash shots of it, but it's been unseasonably cold and it wouldn't have lasted long so I figured I could just as well keep it and make this studio portrait of it once it expired.

This is a dead and prepared specimen stacked from 183 exposures in Zerene Stacker.

Canon 5DmkII, Mitutoyo M Plan Apo 5X/0.14, morfanon tube lens, Nikon PB-6 bellows.

Metellina ♂

Metellina ♂

Metellina mengei
Size: 5 mm (body)

A fully grown male specimen of this species which I assume to be M. mengei due to the fact that it was found in September 2015. 

Stacked from 20 natural light exposures in Zerene Stacker.

Sony NEX-7, Sigma 180/3.5 + Kenko PRO 300 2X teleconverter.

Hippodamia septemmaculata

Hippodamia septemmaculata

Hippodamia septemmaculata
5 mm

Rummaging through my archives I stumbled upon this ladybird that I didn't quite recognize. When I shot it I assumed it was a variant of H. tredecimpunctata (which I've seen several times on this location) but I'm glad I had a second look.

Stacked from 44 natural light exposures in Zerene Stacker.

Canon 5DmkII, Canon MP-E65 @ 3.7X, f/4.5 (+ a few @f/7.1), 0.6s

Grumpy?

Grumpy?

Tipulidae, larva
24 mm

This image shows the peculiar rear end of a crane fly larva. So what may appear like a face is in fact... well, the opposite, or the "spiracular area" to be precise. Crane fly larvae breathe through the posterior spiracles and most species have various protrusions ("lobes") surrounding the spiracular area.

Single shot @ 5X made with Sony NEX-7 and Zeiss Luminar 25mm f/3.5 + diffused flash (Meike MK-300).

Studio stack: Dancing fleas?

Studio stack: Dancing fleas?

Bird fleas, Ceratophyllus gallinae
Size: 2 mm

This is a studio stack of two (dead) bird fleas placed on a microscope slide. I didn't actually position them like this. I placed them on the slide encapsulated in drops of alcohol. However the drops got stuck together and as the alcohol evaporated the fleas  were drawn closer to each other and eventually ended up in this configuration. I liked the symmetry so I decided to shoot them as they were :)

I collected these fleas while helping a friend emptying the bird houses at a local golf course (a procedure repeated each year in March). Please see the comment section for more images and info!

Stacked from 21 exposures in Zerene Stacker (lit with two LED-lights).

Sony NEX-7, Nikon PB-6 bellows, Mitutoyo M Plan Apo 5X/0.14 + Apo-Gerogon 210/9.

Tanbark Borer on Oak

Tanbark Borer on Oak

Phymatodes testaceus, longhorn beetle (Cerambycidae)
Size: 16 mm

Stacked from 35 natural light exposures in Zerene Stacker.

Sony NEX-7, Sigma 180/3.5 @ 1/4s, f/8, ISO100

Studio stack: Osmia

Studio stack: Osmia

Osmia bicornis ♀, Megachilidae

Females of this species have two peculiar horns/protrusions above their mandibles.

This is a studio stack of a dead, cleaned specimen found in my livingroom window.

Stacked from 121 exposures in Zerene Stacker.

Sony NEX-7 with reversed Canon 40/2.8 @ 1.3s, f/4.5, ISO100. This is the so called "nonaC 40/2.8" I've described in this post.

Morning Stretch II

Morning Stretch II

Machimus atricapillus ♀, Asilidae  
15 mm

The previous post featured a slender robberfly in its typical stretched out pose. And here is another species displaying one of its most characteristic morning pose! For some reason Machimus-species seem to prefer this head-down-abdomen-up sleeping position.

The fly remained very still and gave me the ability of  trying out several different angles rendering various backgrounds and lightings. 

This was stacked from 23 natural light exposures in Zerene Stacker. 

Sony NEX-7, Sigma 180/3.5 + Kenko PRO300 2X converter. 
According to the exif, the aperture was f/13 but this is slightly misleading – the nominal aperture is f/6.3. The reason for this discrepancy is the teleconverter which prompts the camera to report some kind of effective aperture (but it's not even that, since magnification is not considered, so I consider it to be a pseudo-effective-aperture-value)

Morning Stretch

Morning Stretch

Leptogaster cylindrica ♂, Asilidae, Slender robberfly
14 mm

This slender robberfly displays the characteristic resting pose of this species. Robberflies are typically very robust but this genus (Leptogaster) has this delicate appearence. Slender robberflies seem perfectly adapted to vertical perches such as grass and I don't recall ever seeing one on a horizontal surface.

Shot in July 2015 and stacked from 13 natural light exposures in Zerene Stacker.

Sony NEX-7, Sigma 180/3.5 @ 1/4s, f/7.1, ISO100

On a Burnt Pine Trunk

On a Burnt Pine Trunk

Choerades gilvus
Size: 17 mm

This robberfly was found on the bark of a large burnt pine tree an early morning in October 2015. It's from one of my visits to a huge forest fire area in central Sweden (I've mentioned it before in my stream).

I'm fascinated by the metallic flake shimmer of the burnt bark.

Stacked from 27 natural light exposures in Zerene Stacker.

Canon 5DmkII, Sigma 180/3.5.

Female Fallbeetle on Thrift

Female Fallbeetle on Thrift

Cryptocephalus sericeus
7 mm

Thrift flowers (Armeria maritima) definitely seem to be a favorite among this species.

Early morning stack from 38 natural light exposures in Zerene Stacker.

Canon 5DmkII, Canon MP-E65 @ 0.6s, f/5.6, ISO100

Stag Beetle on Ice

Stag Beetle on Ice

Lucanus cervus , Lucanidae, Stag beetle
Size: 42 mm

Ok, here's the story of how Swedish roadkill became a 4 ton ice sculpture in Canada: Last summer I was contacted by a PR-agency working to promote an exhibit at the Canadian Museum of Nature in Ottawa. They were specifically  looking for an up close portrait of a stag beetle since these would be featured in the exhibition. I was on vacation and didn't have access to my library so I wasn't sure I would be able to provide them with it. This was in August which means stag beetles, while relatively common at the location, were well past their peak (early-mid July) so I had little hope of actually finding one. Coincidentally I stumbled across a squashed specimen on a road just hours later. It looked pretty bad from above but the underside of the front portion was intact, so I cobbled together a simple studio setup on the porch, got to work and sent over the image you see here. They decided to go ahead with it and we made a licensing agreement. 

It all went along quickly and smoothly and I must confess I'd forgotten about it when, yesterday, I got an email from the agency who just wanted to let me know that the stag beetle had been turned into a 9000 lbs ice sculpture! I think the sculpture is way cooler than the image (pun or not). See comment section on flickr for images! I want to give kudos to clients who're able to take full advantage of the "unlimited use" clause!

Stacked from 35 images in Zerene Stacker.

Canon 5DmkII, Sigma 180/3.5, Kenko PRO300 2X.

Leaf-Cutter Bee

Leaf-Cutter Bee

Megachile willughbiella
Size: 8-9 mm

Early morning portrait of a dew covered leaf-cutter bee resting on a grass spike.

Stacked from 47 natural light exposures in Zerene Stacker.

Sony NEX-7, Canon MP-E65 @ 0.4s, f/6.3, ISO100

Gaurotes on Chamomile

Gaurotes on Chamomile

Gaurotes virginea
10 mm

Early morning stack of this relatively small longhorn beetle on a closed chamomile (Matricaria recutita) flower.

Stacked from 66 natural light eexposures in Zerene Stacker.

Sony NEX-7, Canon MP-E65 @ 0.4s, f/6.3, ISO100

Jumping spider

Jumping spider

Dendryphantes rudis female
5mm

A 5 mm long Dendryphantes rudis female has caught a tiny spider for dinner.

Handheld focus stack from 16 exposures.

Sony NEX-7, Carl Zeiss Luminar 63 mm f/4.5, Meike-MK-300 + DIY diffuser

 

Aromia Sunrise II

Aromia Sunrise II

Aromia moschata, Musk beetle
Size: 30 mm

This is the musk beetle form the last post shot from a different angle. I was able to turn the entire perch 120°, so all that really changed was the angle of the light – but that obviously makes a huge difference!

Stacked from 17 exposures in Zerene Stacker.

Canon 5DmkII, Sigma 180/3.5 @ 0.4s, f/11, ISO100

Aromia Sunrise

Aromia Sunrise

Aromia moschata, Musk beetle
Size: 30 mm

Arguably one of the most beautiful beetles in Europe. In this shot you can't see the metallic coloration but I think the silhuette is quite elegant as well.

I found this specimen nicely perched on this Tanacetum (tancy) an early morning in July. As I was experimenting with different angles my liveview display suddenly flashed white and as I adjusted the exposure I saw this as my lens caught a thin ray of the rising sun, filtered through the trees and vegetation in the background. So, the bright patch is a large out of focus highlight caused by the wide aperture setting.

I should say that I'm not at all a fan of the elaborate out of focus highlights celebrated in some circles. But I liked the jagged texture caused by the light being filtered through vegetation here.

Single shot at f/4.5 except for the antennae which were manually stacked from two additional exposures.

Canon 5DmkII, Sigma 180/3.5 @ f/4.5, 1/60s, ISO100

Baby Crab Spider

Baby Crab Spider

A tiny crab spiderling Misumena vatia, hiding on a Knautia arvensis flower.

And as a bonus: a mating couple of six-spot burnets, Zygaena filipendulae, 17 mm.

Oh, those smug lepidopterans – always trying to steal the show! I'm simply not encouraging that.

Stacked from 37 natural light exposures shot on a breezy morning in late July.

Canon 5DmkII, Sigma 180/3.5 @ 0.8s, f/10, ISO100

Raft Spider

Raft Spider

Dolomedes fimbriatus
Size (body): 22 mm

This is the largest spider species we have here in Sweden. Obviously, it's nothing compared to what can be found in many other places, but it's still a fairly impressive animal. Especially when you consider the ease with witch, even fully grown females such as this one, can move over a water surface. This one dove down and hid beneath the log you see in the background for a few minutes when I first approached it. But I stayed put and when it resurfaced it completely seemed to ignore my presence (I could even pet it).

Single mixed light exposure (diffused built in flash + natural light).

Sony NEX-7, Sony 18-55 (kit-zoom), 10 mm extension tube

(more shots in the comment section on flickr)

Tanbark Borer

Tanbark Borer

Phymatodes testaceus, longhorn beetle (Cerambycidae)
Size: 16 mm

This year I encountered this beautiful Cerambycid several times. Typically you'll find this species on the underside of large oak logs during warm summer days, but this one was nicely perched on this lichen-covered branch early in the morning – practically begging to be photographed. It looks pristine with every little hair intact and vivid coloration so I'm guessing it's a newly hatched specimen. It's a variable species in terms of coloration but this is probably the most common variety.

Stacked from 45 natural light exposures in Zerene Stacker.

Sony NEX-7, Sigma 180/3.5 @ 1/8s, f/7,1, ISO100

Framed bee

Framed bee

Melittidae? 
Size: 8 mm

Early morning stack from mid July 2015.

I thought this bee had framed itself so nicely I couldn't resist shooting it from this angle. When I was done with the sequence I wanted to turn it around in my subject clamp in order to shoot it laterally and dorsally for ID-purposes. However, I was clumsy and nudged the clamp with my foot. When I looked up the bee was gone, so this is all I have...

29 natural light exposures stacked in Zerene Stacker.

Sony NEX-7, Sigma 180/3,5 @ f/8, 1/5s, ISO200

Sleeping on Bedstraw

Sleeping on Bedstraw

A cuckoo wasp Holopyga generosa sleeping on lady's bedstraw (Galium verum)
Size: 7 mm

During this very dark season I've found processing summer shots to have an almost therapeutic effect! This is an early morning stack from July 2015.

Stacked from 29 natural light exposures in Zerene Stacker.

Sony NEX-7, Canon MP-E65 @ f/6.3, 0.5s, ISO100

Fox Moth II

Fox Moth II

Macrothylacia rubi
Wingspan ≈ 60 mm

A frontal view of the fox moth I posted a dorsal view of a couple of weeks ago.

Stacked from 45 natural light exposures in Zerene Stacker.

Sony NEX-7, Sigma 180/3,5 @ 1/6s, f/8, ISO100

Gaurotes virginea

Gaurotes virginea

Gaurotes virginea, Cerambycidae
Size: 10 mm

Early morning stack of this little long horn beetle on a cow parsely flower (Anthriscus sylvestris).

Stacked from 55 natural light exposures in Zerene stacker. 

Sony NEX-7, Canon MP-E65 @ 0.4s, f/6,3, ISO100

Hylaeus Bee

Hylaeus Bee

Hylaeus confusus, Colletidae (ID-cred: G. Holmström) 
Size: 7 mm

These little bees have interesting front legs. They appear smaller and weaker than the the remaining four legs and are often kept elevated like in this image. I've noticed they often use them for cleaning etcetera, so they are certainly not useless. Still, they remind me a little of the vestigial front legs you'll find in certain butterfly species.

This is another stack shot during my trip to the isolated island Gotska Sandön in the Baltic sea.

Stacked from 17 natural light exposures in Zerene stacker. 

Sony NEX-7, Canon MP-E65 @ f/5.6, 0.5s, ISO100

Ladybug on fern

Ladybug on fern

Cocinella septempunctata, Seven spot ladybird
8 mm

I've already dubbed it the world's most photographed beetle in a previous post so I wasn't sure about posting this one. But... this was such a beutiful specimen and it's perched on the underside of a fern leaf, packed with sori.

Stacked from 39 natural light exposures in Zerene Stacker.

Canon 5DmkII, Canon MP-E65 @ 2.2X, 1/5s, f/5.6, ISO100

Postfire forest

Postfire forest

Neoitamus sp. (Asilidae), (ID-cred: P. Hall & M. Persson)
Size: 13 mm

This was shot during a trip to a huge wildfire area in June. The forest fire raged in the summer of 2014 and was declared a national emergency, eventually encompassing 17,000 hectares.

Though this fire was of course a traumatic event for many local residents it has undeniably created an interesting and valuable environment from a biological standpoint. Especially since a fairly large portion of the fire area has now been protected as a natural reserve, many species will benefit from the fire.

Stanislav and I have made a few trips to this area and this was shot during an early morning session in June this year. We found plenty of these fairly small robberflies scattered in the singed pine twigs. The dark background is a tree stump, turned into charcoal by the fire. 

Stacked from 30 natural light exposures in Zerene Stacker.

Sony NEX-7, Canon MP-E65 @ f/5.6, 1/4s, ISO100

Full Spectrum Wasp

Full Spectrum Wasp

Holopyga cf. generosa, Cuckoo wasp
Size: 7 mm

These little wasps are always a delight to find. Their colors are truly astonishing.

This one proved to be a bit of a challange to get a successful stacking sequence of and I ended up having to manually combine the results from two similar but separate stacking sequences. One was 24 exposures @ 1/20, f/5.6, ISO100. The other was 25 exposures @ 1/15, f/7.1, ISO200.

Sony NEX-7, Canon MP-E65

Xysticus on Geranium

Xysticus on Geranium

Xysticus cf. cristatus (Thomisidae) ID-cred: T. Holmgren
Size: 8 mm

A female crab spider on the colorful leaves of Geranium macrorrhizum. Despite the fall colors this image was actually taken in mid July. Judging from the girth of her abdomen I'm guessing this spider is about to lay eggs.

Stacked from 14 natural light exposures in Zerene Stacker.

Sony NEX-7, Sigma 180/3.5 @ 1/20s, f/8, ISO100

Small Parasitoid Wasp

Small Parasitoid Wasp

Braconidae, Probably subfamily Doryctinae
Size: 4-5 mm

During a night session in July I found several of these little wasps, drilling for hosts in a freshly felled aspen trunk.

Single handheld exposure with Sony NEX-7 + Canon MP-E65 @ 5X, f/10, 1/50s, ISO200. Lit with a Meike MK-300 flash + DIY-diffuser.

Tiny Pillbugs

Tiny Pillbugs

Armadillidium pulchellum
Ø 2.5 mm (roughly 5 mm when extended)

I found these nicely colored pillbugs underneath the bark of an old decaying birch just a minute's walk from my doorstep. If my ID is correct, it does not appear to be a very common species. That is, it's not often being reported. In fact, mine appears to be the most northern record of this species (in Sweden) and the closest find is more than 150 km from here (with mostly sea in between) or  > 300 km to the second closest find. However, something tells me this is a grossly overlooked (and under reported) group of arthropods, and it wouldn't surprise me if this species is much more common than we think.

Stacked from five handheld exposures in Zerene Stacker. Each 1/60, f/10, ISO100.

Shot with the gear described in my previous post: Sony NEX-7 + nonaC 40/2.8. Lighting provided by a diffused Meike MK-300.

Pearly Heath on Allium

Pearly Heath on Allium

Coenonympha arcania, pearly heath
Wingspan ≈ 35 mm

I peculiar detail that I didn't notice while shooting this, is how it got its proboscis curled around its leg.

Stacked from 17 natural light exposures in Zerene Stacker.

Sony NEX-7, Sigma 180/3.5 @ 0.5s, f/11, ISO100

Megachilid on rose II

Megachilid on rose II

Megachile willughbiella
Size: 8-9 mm

A closer view of the bee from the previous post. The bee is "waking up" here and paused it's morning grooming enough for me to shoot a quick sequence of shots. Shortly after shooting this, it wiped it's antennae and flew away as shown in this youtube clip.

The enlarged hairy front legs are used to cover the eyes of the female during the mating ritual.

Stacked from 29 natural light exposures in Zerene Stacker.

Sony NEX-7 + Canon MP-E65 @ 4X, 1/6s, f/7.1, ISO100

Megachilid on rose

Megachilid on rose

♂ Megachile willughbiella
Size: 8-9 mm

The enlarged hairy front legs are used to cover the eyes of the female during the maing ritual. 

Stacked from 31 natural light exposures in Zerene Stacker.

Sony NEX-7, Sigma 180/3.5 @ slightly below 1:1, 1/30s, f/8.0, ISO100.

Studio stack: Cuckoo wasp

Studio stack: Cuckoo wasp

A species in the difficult Chrysis ignita group.
Size: 7-8 mm

Posting this from my hotel room one day before the opening of my biggest exhibition yet at ABECITA Museum of Modern Art in Borås, Sweden. This image is one of 62 large format prints (averaging at above 100cm).

This particular image is also featured in my most recent book "Livet som minimonster" ("Life as a mini-monster") – a children's book focusing on the fascinating life cycles of insects and spiders (see comment section). 

Stacked from 178 exposures in Zerene Stacker. 

Sony NEX-7, Mitutoyo M Plan Apo 10/0.28, 170mm tube-lens ("morfanon"), Nikon PB-6 bellows, Cognisys StackShot.

Fairy Moth

Fairy Moth

♂ Adela cuprella Adelidae
7.5 mm

The most prominent feature of these little moths is arguably their very long antennae. In males they are several times longer than the body – see comment section for a lower magnification view. On closer inspection I think I find their metallic scales to be an even more attractive feature though.

Stacked from 27 natural light exposures in Zerene Stacker.

Canon 5DmkII, Canon MP-E65 @ 3.7X, 1/15s, f/5.6 and f/7.1, ISO200

 

Robber and noctuid eggs

Robber and noctuid eggs

Machimus (Tolmerus) atricapillus
Size: 15 mm

This grass spike was almost completely covered in noctuid (moth) eggs. I don't think this robber fly took much notice though.

Stacked from 10 natural light exposures in Zerene Stacker.

A few additional shots in the first comment on flickr, including one showing the setup.

Canon 5DmkII, Schneider-Kreuznach Apo-Componon 90/4,5 (reversed), Nikon PB-6 bellows.

 

Studio stack: Neomida

Studio stack: Neomida

♂ Neomida haemorrhoidalis, Tenebrionidae

Size: 6 mm

Studio portrait of this horned little darkling beetle (dead/prepared specimen). It's not very common here in Sweden. Found in an old bracket fungus growing on a dead birch.

Females lack the protruding hornes above the eyes.

Stacked from 274 exposures in Zerene Stacker.

Sony NEX-7, Nikon PB-6 bellows, morfanon tube lens, Mitutoyo M Plan Apo 10/0.28

 

Sympecma

Sympecma

Winter Damselfly, Sympecma fusca

Early morning stack shot in May 2014 during a macro workshop I held.

Some tricky direct sunlight hitting the subject from behind/left. Obviously this would have been easy to diffuse/shade but I wanted to capture how the sun highlighted the fine hairs on head and thorax and the well defined leg shadow on the grass.

23 natural light exposures stacked in Zerene Stacker.

Canon 5DmkII, Canon MP-E65 @ 2.2X, 0.4s, f/6.3, ISO200

 

Egg laying Jewel Beetle

Egg laying Jewel Beetle

Agrilus sp., Buprestidae (I'm leaning towards A. suvorovi)
Size: 9 mm

A bluish variety of the Agrilus from the previous post. At least I think it's the same species – they seemed quite variable in coloration, ranging all the way from bronze to green and blue.

This female specimen has deposited eggs on a beaver felled Aspen log and is now in the process of "brushing". This means covering them with some kind of secretion. She does this by repeatedly brushing the tip of her abdomen over the the eggs whilst excreting some fluid. See the comment section for a youtube clip showing this process!

This is a single handheld (mixed light) exposure, manually patched with a few pixels from a consecutive frame in order to get the entire eye in focus.

Canon 5DmkII, Canon 270EX, Canon MP-E65 @ 2.7X (cropped), 1/100s, f/7.1, ISO400

BTW, I've been playing with a new DIY-diffuser design the past season – most of the hand held shots from 2014 posted so far has been with this diffuser. Expect som more info on it soon!

Watch this in action on youtube:  youtu.be/yhY1APtcsWk

More on flickr: https://flic.kr/p/qRUwfG

 

Studio stack: Ceruchus eye, 20X

Studio stack: Ceruchus eye, 20X

Ceruchus chrysomelinus ♂ (Lucanidae)
Size: 16 mm (field of view: 1.5 mm)

This is a 20X view of the eye of this stag beetle. I found the pitted texture surrounding the eye to be particularly interesting. This species is very rare here in Sweden (I'm yet to find one in the field). This specimen was borrowed from Stanislav's collection (collected by him in the eastern part of the Czech Republic). It's been featured at lower magnification in a couple of earlier posts.

Stacked from 156 exposures in Zerene Stacker. Shot at ≈20X and slightly cropped.

Canon 5DmkII, Nikon PB-6 bellows, Apo-Gerogon 210/9 (acting as tube lens), Mitutoyo M Plan Apo 20/0.42 microscope objective

 

Large Mayfly

Large Mayfly

Ephemera vulgata ♂ (ID-cred: C. Raper) Ephemeridae
Size: 19 mm

These spend 2-3 years as larvae but very short time as adults (a few days). They do not feed as adults (and lack functioning mouthparts) but are completely focused on reproduction. In essence, they finish off their life as flying genitals.

Stacked from 25 natural light exposures in Zerene Stacker.

Canon 5DmkII, Canon MP-E65 @ 1X (slightly cropped), 1/20s, f/5.6, ISO200

Here I've experimented with a polarizer as well (since the sun was causing some troublesome highlights). Not something I typically do but perhaps worth considering from time to time.

 

Studio stack: Ostoma

Studio stack: Ostoma

Ostoma ferruginea, Trogossitidae
Size 9 mm

A different take on the species from the last post. This dead/prepared specimen was borrowed from a friend's collection.

This is was shot in the studio with darkfield style lighting (light coming from behind). See the comment section on flickr for more info!

Stacked from 160 exposures in Zerene Stacker.

Canon 5DmkII, Nikon PB-6 bellows, Mitutoyo M Plan Apo 5X 0,14, morfanon tube lens.

 

Studio stack: Xylotrechus

Studio stack: Xylotrechus

Xylotrechus rusticus, Aspen zebra beetle, Cerambycidae (long horned beetles)
Size: 17 mm

Studio portrait of this very common long horned beetle. In the comment section on flickr: https://flic.kr/p/qFXU8N you'll find some field shots as well as a youtube-clip featuring this beetle. 

This species is not as colorful as some of its close relatives but it's beautifully shaped and I'm always pleased to find it. Funny how some species becomes "favorites" despite the fact that you can't put your finger on exactly what makes them special... In this case there might simply be some pavlovian explanation behind it – these guys show up my favorite time of year (June) when everything is pleasant: sun is shining, birds are singing and everything is growing, breeding, living...

This portrait shows a dead/prepared specimen, shot under studio conditions and stacked from 120 exposures in Zerene Stacker.

Canon 5DmkII, Mitutoyo M Plan Apo 5/0.14 microscope objective, morfanon tube lens, Nikon PB-6 bellows.

 

Ostoma parking lot

Ostoma parking lot

Ostoma ferruginea, Trogossitidae
Size 8-10 mm

These flattened beetles are closely associated with brown-rot fungi (such as Fomitopsis pinicola or Antrodia xantha) and you find them in rotting wood. These were found underneath the bark and/or inside the wood of a large rotting spruce.

This wide angle close-up was shot in 2013 as part of a book project I've mentioned here: https://flic.kr/p/geivZ3

More shots in the comment section on flickr: https://flic.kr/p/qHh32b

Single handheld natural light exposure . Canon 5DmkII, Nikon Nikkor 28/2.8 AI-s, Nikon K1 extension tube | 0.5s, f/16, ISO200

Drilling for hosts II

Drilling for hosts II

Echthrus sp. (probably), Cryptinae, Ichneumonidae 
ID-cred: I. Österblad & G. Várkonyi
Size: 8 mm

These wasps find their hosts using echo-localization. They rapidly tap their antennae like drumsticks against the wood surface and the echoing vibrations are then picked up by their slightly enlarged front legs (tibia).

Found and shot at the same location as the previous post. Beavers have been working hard here – hundreds of felled trees (mainly aspens) are providing excellent breeding sites for a large variety of insects.

I found many other interesting species on the very same log (see in the comment section on flickr: https://flic.kr/p/qqgMZu

Stacked from 6 handheld mixed light (natural light + diffused flash) exposures in Zerene Stacker.

Canon 5DmkII, diffused Canon 270EX, Canon MP-E65 @ 2.4X, 1/60, f/10, ISO400

Brown Hawker Encounter

Brown Hawker Encounter

Aeshna grandis (on my son's finger)
Size: 70 mm

This dragonfly seemed a bit lethargic when we first found it close to the ground by the path. At first we thought something was wrong with it but soon we realized it was probably just cold – after a couple of minutes sitting on my sons finger it seemed to came to and eventually flew away.

Single exposure made with Sony NEX-7, Sony E 18-55 OSS + short extension tube. Natural light + diffused pop-up flash.

I'm adding another couple of shots from this encounter (made with the same gear) in the comment section on flickr: https://flic.kr/p/qHwRu4

 ♂♂  Machimus atricapillus (Tolmerus atricapillus)  Size: 14 mm  A male robberfly feeding on a defeated rival.   This is a handheld mixed light stack shot in August 2014.  16 exposures stacked in Zerene Stacker.   Canon 5DmkII, Canon MP-E65, Canon 270EX + DIY beautydish diffuser | 1/100s, f/6.3, ISO100.   https://flic.kr/p/qjiRvZ    

♂♂ Machimus atricapillus (Tolmerus atricapillus)
Size: 14 mm

A male robberfly feeding on a defeated rival. 

This is a handheld mixed light stack shot in August 2014.

16 exposures stacked in Zerene Stacker. 

Canon 5DmkII, Canon MP-E65, Canon 270EX + DIY beautydish diffuser | 1/100s, f/6.3, ISO100.

https://flic.kr/p/qjiRvZ

 

World's most photographed beetle?

World's most photographed beetle?

Coccinella septempunctata
Size: 8 mm

Certainly not the most exotic coleopteran out there, but I kind of like the mood in this one.

Early morning stack shot back in June. It was a rather windy morning but the light was nice – not too even, not too harsh.

21 frames stacked in Zerene Stacker. Canon 5DmkII, Canon MP-E65 @ 1/6s, f/6,3, ISO200

More info: https://flic.kr/p/qvw4Eb

 

Ruby Whiteface

Ruby Whiteface

Leucorrhinia rubicunda
Size: 35 mm

Early morning stack of this Ruby Whiteface, shot in June 2014.

Stacked from 19 natural light exposures in Zerene Stacker.

Canon 5DmkII, Nikon PB-6 bellows, Apo-Componon 90/4,5.

https://flic.kr/p/qbjVb9

Hornet Robberfly II

Hornet Robberfly II

Asilus crabroniformis
28 mm

This is the large robberfly featured in the previous post from a different perspective and in a more active pose.

This stack was shot in the evening and is rendered from 31 natural light exposures combined in Zerene Stacker.

Canon 5DmkII, Canon MP-E65 @ 1.0X, 1/5s, f/8.0, ISO400

More info: http://flic.kr/p/quJdn3

 

 

Ruby Whiteface II

Ruby Whiteface II

Leucorrhinia rubicunda
Size: 35 mm

Wide angle close-up of the dragonfly from the last post.

Shot 05:33 a summer morning at my favorite spot, with a Sony NEX-7 and the cheap but well performing little kit-zoom (18-55 mm 3,5-5,6 OSS @ 19 mm, 1/30s, f/11, ISO400 )

https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnhallmen/16055023751/

Studio stack: Long-jawed orb weaver

Studio stack: Long-jawed orb weaver

Studio stack: Pachygnatha clercki ♂, Tetragnathidae
Size: 6 mm (inlcuding chelicerae)

Posting this studio stacked image taken in early 2012 to celebrate that my book "Bugs Up Close" is now available in English from Amazon and elsewhere: www.amazon.com/Bugs-Up-Close-Magnified-Incredible/dp/1629...

I haven't seen the English print version yet, but can only hope the print/production quality is on par with the Swedish, Finnish and Danish editions.

**

This little spider was found in the winter while searching for hibernating bugs (two years ago). I shot it in the field as documented in this video clip from the occasion: youtu.be/EpbCngGAIkA. I brought the specimen with me for ID. It was preserved in the freezer for a few months.

Stacked from 301 images in Zerene Stacker. Canon 5DmkII, Nikon PB-6 bellows, Mitutoyo M Plan Apo 10/0,28, morfanon tube lens.

More info: https://flic.kr/p/q7pyXP

 

Frost Survivor

Frost Survivor

Anthomyiidae (I think)

Size: 6 mm

 

Found this fly slowly treading over this frosty stalk just as the sun was coming over the tree line. Minutes later all the frost was gone. I'm guessing the fly had spent the night in a slighly more sheltered place and emerged at the first sight of sunlight.

 

19 natural light exposures stacked in Zerene Stacker.

 

Canon 5DmkII, Canon MP-E65 @ 2.4X, 1/5s, f/5.6, ISO200

Sign of spring?

Sign of spring?

Melting frost crystals on a dry grass leaf from last year.

 

As the sun rises above the tree line the frost crystals melt in a matter of minutes. The dry grass in the background takes on a distinctly golden tone. 

 

Stacked from 37 natural light exposures in Zerene Stacker.

 

Canon 5DmkII + reversed Pentacon 50/1.8 on Olympus telescopic extension tube.

 

This image was shot as a part of a project where this 50mm lens is sent around the world to 50 different photographers.

Frost

Frost

Grass leaf covered in frost. Nights and early mornings are still cold here in Stockholm, Sweden (April 2014)! 

 

37 natural light exposures stacked in Zerene Stacker

 

Canon 5DmkII + Canon MP-E65

Queen of Spain Fritillary II

Queen of Spain Fritillary II

 

Issoria lathonia, Nymphalidae

Body length: 17 mm

 

Normally I wouldn't post two such similar images but in this case I thought it was interesting to note how the light changed in just 10 minutes. Here, the sun has come up more and it's now shining on the meadow in the background. In this time, while I was busy with another subject, the butterfly had moved to a slightly higher position but still remained on the same plant.

 

25 exposures stacked in Zerene Stacker.

 

Canon 5DmkII, Canon MP-E65 @ 1X, 1/80s, f/5.6

Gymnosoma from behind

Gymnosoma from behind

 

Gymnosoma sp., Tachinidae

Size: 6 mm

 

This was shot in 2012 but I've disregarded it because of wing movements causing major artifacts in the stacking process. I revisited it now and applied the local stacking technique (described this an earlier post») which solved the problems I was having. So, think twice before throwing problematic stacking sequences away – who knows what we'll be able to fix in the future :)

 

73 natural light expoures stacked in Zerene Stacker. It moved both wings independently so I had to run two separate local stacks.

 

Canon 5DmkII, Nikon PB-6 bellows, reversed Apo-Componon 40/2,8.

Flat bug family

Flat bug family

Aneurus avenius Aradidae, male + larvae

ID-cred: CC Coulianos

Size: 5 mm (adult specimen)

 

You typically find these peculiar, almost two-dimensional, bugs under bark. I'm somewhat puzzled by they "bullseye" pattern on the back of the larvae – any theories?

 

Single exposure, Canon 5DmkII + Canon MP-E65 + Canon 270EX flash with yoghurt-bottle diffuser.

Queen of Spain Fritillary

Queen of Spain Fritillary

 

Issoria lathonia, Nymphalidae

Body length: 17 mm

 

Early morning stack of this butterfly resting on dry filipendula. This migrating species fluctuates significantly in numbers from year to year here in Sweden. Generally it's rather scarce but some years they show up in larger numbers. This was shot in 2013 (August) which I think would qualify as a mediocre year for this species in Sweden.

 

Stacked from 26 natural light exposures in Zerene Stacker.

 

Canon 5DmkII + Canon MP-E65 @ 1X, 1/100s, f/5, ISO200

Earthworm in the studio!

Earthworm in the studio!

 

Unknown earthworm species Lumbricidae

80 mm in length

 

Tomorrow (March 6th) marks the release of our children's book Minimonster i naturen (website ») here in Sweden!

 

This earthworm is one of the featured bugs in the book. Like most images in the book it was shot specifically for this, and here I wanted to capture the bristles called setae on the worm's body! They provide grip against the substrate and thus help the worm to move both forward and backward!

 

This is a studio stack of a prepared specimen. It's stacked from 45 exposures and in Zerene stacker.

 

Canon 5DmkII + Nikon PB-6 bellows + reversed Schneider-Kreuznach Apo-Componon 60/4

Small Soldier Fly

Small Soldier Fly

Stratiomyidae. Possibly Microchrysa sp.

Size: 5 mm

 

A single exposure of a little soldier fly taking a sip of dew from this dry grass spike.

 

The fly was quite active but I did get a couple of short stacks as well. In this case I preferred this "single" image. It's f/8 but manually patched with a few pixels from an otherwise identical f/5.6 exposure (for less diffraction in the focused parts).

 

Canon 5DmkII, Canon MP-E65 @ 4.3X, 1s, f/5.5 & f/8, ISO100